+1 604 564 9431

info@ciraschool.com

896 W 8th Avenue

Vancouver, BC

09:00 - 16:00

Monday to Friday

+1 604 355 6218

info@ciraschool.com

896 W 8th Avenue

Vancouver, BC

09:00 - 16:00

Monday to Friday

The child has one intuitive aim: self development

What You Should Know in High School

In high school, things can get pretty overwhelming. You’re dealing with trying to get good grades and getting into university, while also dealing with friendships and personal issues – it can be a lot. But there are some things that are good to focus on, and some things you can zoom out a little bit. Here is a list of things people wish they actually focused on and learned in high school.

1. What Jobs Are Out There

In high school, people aren’t exposed to the biggest variety of jobs. You know what your parents do, you know that people are teachers, lawyers and doctors – but there are so many jobs in between. If you’ve worked in restaurants and food service all your life, hospitality management is a solid career path. If you’re interested in medicine, but don’t want to be a doctor, you could be an X-ray tech, a pharmacist, a sonographer – there are so many more paths. Ask your friend’s what their parents do, and really listen. Don’t just pick a career because it’s what you know – there’s so much more out there!

2. Your Major Isn’t That Important

There are only a few majors that result in direct career paths – but for the most part if you don’t like what you do, you probably won’t end up going down that path. University or college is a stepping stone –  you meet people and get a network, you learn about how to learn and how to work with people. I mean, you do learn information but the kind of information you need for jobs you’ll likely learn on the job. So pick something you like learning about and give your all – you’ll have a better time and actually learn more. Even getting into med school now doesn’t require a science degree – it’s about you and what you can bring to the table.

3. Hobbies Actually Are Important

So many people don’t really feel like they’re a part of the school until they join a club. Having a hobby that you love is a great way to make friends and lighten the load of school. High school is a great time to try new hobbies, take classes and join clubs – and  this carries over to university. Joining clubs in university helps you meet new people and feel more school spirit. Your memories of school won’t come from the tests you studied for, but from doing the things you actually enjoyed.

4. Getting a Job is so Helpful

Starting your savings early is never a bad idea, and getting a job is a way to start building employable skills. Working is a great way to meet friends or spend time with your existing friends while doing something productive! Here’s a list of jobs that are great for high school students. Also, being able to spend your own money instead of relying on parents is a great freedom to have.

5. Start Thinking About Money

We’re talking about saving, investing and building credit. It’s never too early to start thinking about budgeting. Look into simple ways of budgeting like using an app or just setting aside some money every month. It’s so important to build good habits, and future you will be so thankful. Also, investing early can make a huge difference in your life. Start small with what you have and see your money grow over the years! On that note, when you can, get a credit card and start building credit. Make just a few purchases on your credit card and pay it off every month to start building your credit score.

6. Be Friends With Your Teachers

Don’t be afraid to actually connect with teachers. I mean, don’t be annoying or anything, but your teachers are people too and building relationships with them can be helpful. They might be your future references, or might recommend you if they know someone looking to hire. Take the time to be friendly with them and ask them questions when you’re confused about school, or even life.

7. Look Into Your University Options Early

It’s easy to get lazy with school applications, you might already know what school you want to go to and not try to apply to other schools. But picking a school that truly fits you can make all the difference. Look into schools early, ask people where they went and consider what matters to you. That doesn’t mean you have to pick already, just start thinking about it. Also, take a look at what scholarships exist in different schools and in general. So many scholarships are out there and some have very few applicants. Doing a bit of research can carry you a long way!

8. Grades Aren’t Everything

Yes, grades are important, but so is your mental health. The difference between an A and a B on a project in high school may seem huge, but in reality might not change much. Know when to give yourself a break and when to work hard. There’s so much more to university applications than grades, being involved in your community and engaged in extracurricular activities may look better than a 97% in Social Studies. It’s so overwhelming in high school, but try to breathe and take a step back when you can.

9. Your Friends May Leave

The friends you make in high school might not stay with you for your whole life. People move away, friendships fade. It isn’t a bad thing, and sometimes we need to remember that friends exist in chapters of our life. Some people stay in your life the whole time, and some only for a few years, that doesn’t mean they’re a bad person or that you’re a bad person. People change and evolve, Appreciate the time you have together and know t

10. How to Take Care of Your Body

Find a way to exercise that makes you happy! Get into flossing and take care of your teeth. Get into skincare now so that you are happy with your skin later. Making good choices for your body now will just help you continue those choices throughout your life. Start learning how to book your own appointments so you’re not lost in university. Take advantage of Youth Clinics, they are much nicer than other health clinics and will help you feel comfortable in your body.

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